Myanmar Redux - Part 1

October 14, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Putting together the previous post of faces of women in Burma (Myanmar) caused me to think about changes that have occurred in my photography during the last 5 years.  First of all, I'm using cameras that are two generations newer than the one used in Burma.  They open up new opportunities.  There have been other, perhaps more significant, changes too:

  • Advances in the software I use to complete the picture taking process ... Many of the "typical" problem areas now have practical solutions 
  • My skills in post processing are much better than they were five years ago ... in my opinion. 
  • Finally, there has been growth ... or at least, changes in my view of the world.  Those changes creep into the images I take today, but also into my view of those I've taken in the past... what I passed by yesterday, I might not pass by today.

So as I gathered those images in the previous post, I realized it might be worthwhile to review other "original" raw images from the camera that had not previously been processed.  I found a "bunch" of them ... many have not been see before, and some have been using new techniques and capabilities.

 

The Ubein Bridge at  Sunset

This heavily-used, 3/4 mile long bridge was built around 1850 and is believed to be the oldest and longest teakwood bridge in the world. These two images were taken from a small boat at Sunset.

 

This next is my favorite of the two.  I didn't recall seeing it during my earlier "passes" through the Burma images.

 

The Cave:

On our travels to Inle Lake, we visited a cave built into the side of a hill that contained hundreds (more than a thousand?) of statues of Buddha.  Here's two images that hadn't been processed:

 

 

A Fly On The Beer:

I know ... it makes no sense unless you've visited a hot, tropical county.  Then a nice cold beer makes a lot of sense! Unlike most images, I can not remember taking this picture ... and no, I didn't have that many beers. :)  Oh, by the way, I really liked the beer in Burma.

 

A Spider in the Web:

They grow 'em big in those tropical countries!

 

I'll do one or two more "recovered" photos posts in the next week or two.  

Did you remember to click on an image to see a larger version?

As always, Thank You for taking the time to look.

 

Adam

P.S.  To see all of the images that I'd previously processed from  Myanmar, go here:

        http://naturallightimages.zenfolio.com/f1010730329

 


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